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Grade 2 Math Standards Resources

It is recommended that teachers review activities and read the associated directions and/or lesson plan ideas prior to using them with their students. In some cases, the activities are very open-ended and are best used in conjunction with paper/pencil activities or when students are paired and working on a single computer. If the directions and/or lesson plans are not obvious, a link is provided within the description of the resource.

It is essential that these standards be addressed in contexts that promote problem solving, reasoning, communication, making connections, and designing and analyzing representations.

2.1 Number and Operations: Develop an understanding of the base-ten numeration system and place-value concepts.

2.1.1

Write, compare, and order whole numbers to 1000.

Dog Bone

Give the Dog a Bone

Students find 10 hidden bones on the 1-100 number square in 60 seconds. Random numbers are listed on the side which students need to click on the appropriate blank square in the 100 grid. Highly motivating site for students.

2.1.2

Understand and apply base-ten numeration, and count in multiples of one, two, five, ten, and one hundred.

Counter Square

Hundreds Chart - Countersquare

Students and teachers using a hundred chart, can mark and identify patterns in number and times table sequence, label odd and even numbers, label prime numbers and can develop games.

Appropriate for teacher demonstrations.

2.1.3

Compose and decompose whole numbers less than one thousand by place value (e.g., 426 as 4 hundreds + 2 tens + 6 ones and 400 + 20 + 6).

Base Blocks

Base Blocks Addition

Students use base ten blocks to solve addition exercises by regrouping pieces. Can be used to show place value for numbers and helps with understanding of addition. It is a good resource to visually show regrouping. Appropriate for teacher demonstrations. Spanish version available.

Allows students to practice creating and manipulating a given number using base ten blocks from the thousands place to the thousandths place with a maximum of four place value spaces. This activity can be used to demonstrate base 10, 5, 4, 3, and 2. You can limit the place value to ones and tens to match skill levels of students.

Students are able to drag an block (e.g. 10s block) to the right to break it apart into smaller blocks (e.g. ten 1s blocks) and also combine groups of smaller place value blocks into larger place value blocks. Need to instruct students on how to group the blocks before moving using the "lasso."

Red Square

Base Blocks Subtraction

Students use base ten blocks to solve subtraction exercises by exchanging and canceling out pieces. Can be used to show place value for numbers and to increase understanding of subtraction. Appropriate for teacher demonstrations. Spanish version available.

Units in the one's place need to be subtracted individually (unlike the addition of base blocks where you can lasso ten to regroup). The teacher should model how to "lasso" and drag to cancel out blocks before having students use this activity.

Drum

Base 10

Students create 1 digit to 3 digit number amounts (can be customized), using base 10 blocks, by adding or removing blocks from display area. Number sense concepts are also reinforced as numbers are shown in written form as well as on a number line.

2.1.4

Use place value and properties of operations to find and use equivalent representations of numbers (such as 35 represented by 35 ones, 3 tens and 5 ones, or 2 tens and 15 ones).

  N/A

 

2.2 Number and Operations and Algebra: Develop fluency with addition facts and related subtraction facts, and with multi-digit addition and subtraction.

2.2.1

Apply, with fluency, sums to 20 and related subtraction facts.

Four

Arithmetic Four

Students must answer arithmetic questions (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division) to earn a piece to place on the board (like the children's game Connect Four). Time limit, difficulty level, and types of questions can be changed.

2.2.2

Solve multi-digit whole number problems by applying various meanings (e.g., taking away, and comparing) and models (e.g., combining or separating sets, using number lines, and hundreds charts) of addition and subtraction.

Base Blocks

Base Blocks Addition

Users manipulate base ten blocks to solve addition exercises by regrouping pieces. Can be used to show place value for numbers and helps with understanding of addition. It is a good resource to visually show regrouping. Appropriate for teacher demonstrations.

Students practice creating and manipulating a given number using base ten blocks from the thousands place to the thousandths place with a maximum of four place value spaces. This activity can be used to demonstrate base 10, 5, 4, 3, and 2. You can limit the place value to ones and tens to match skill levels of students.

Students are able to drag an block (e.g. 10s block) to the right to break it apart into smaller blocks (e.g. ten 1s blocks) and also combine groups of smaller place value blocks into larger place value blocks. Need to instruct students on how to group the blocks before moving using the "lasso."

Red Square

Base Blocks Subtraction

Students use base ten blocks to solve subtraction exercises by exchanging and canceling out pieces. Can be used to show place value for numbers and to increase understanding of subtraction. Appropriate for teacher demonstrations.

Units in the one's place need to be subtracted individually (unlike the addition of base blocks where you can lasso ten to regroup). The teacher should model how to "lasso" and drag to cancel out blocks before having students use this activity.

2.2.3

Develop fluency with efficient procedures for adding and subtracting multi-digit whole numbers and understand why the procedures work on the basis of place value and number properties.

Base Blocks

Base Blocks Addition

Users manipulate base ten blocks to solve addition exercises by regrouping pieces. Can be used to show place value for numbers and helps with understanding of addition. It is a good resource to visually show regrouping. Appropriate for teacher demonstrations.

Students practice creating and manipulating a given number using base ten blocks from the thousands place to the thousandths place with a maximum of four place value spaces. This activity can be used to demonstrate base 10, 5, 4, 3, and 2. You can limit the place value to ones and tens to match skill levels of students.

Students are able to drag a block (e.g. 10s block) to the right to break it apart into smaller blocks (e.g. ten 1s blocks) and also combine groups of smaller place value blocks into larger place value blocks. Need to instruct students on how to group the blocks before moving using the "lasso."

Red Square

Base Blocks Subtraction

Students use base ten blocks to solve subtraction exercises by exchanging and canceling out pieces. Can be used to show place value for numbers and to increase understanding of subtraction. Appropriate for teacher demonstrations.

Units in the one's place need to be subtracted individually (unlike the addition of base blocks where you can lasso ten to regroup). The teacher should model how to "lasso" and drag to cancel out blocks before having students use this activity.

Diffy

Diffy

Diffy is designed to stimulate student practice of subtraction. Students find the difference between pairs of numbers on each side of a square to solve a puzzle. Students choose which kind of numbers to use (whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals, or money).

2.2.4

Select and apply efficient methods to estimate sums and differences or calculate them mentally depending on the numbers and context involved.

  N/A

2.2.5

Determine the value of mixed collections of coins to $1.00.

Money

Money (choose "Make A Dollar")

Provides ways for students to practice counting/adding money. Activities include making a dollar, identifying how much money is shown and paying an exact amount. Students may make a dollar more than one way under the Make a Dollar activity.

This activity is only good for students who know the value of the coins and bills. It allows the students to move the bills and coins together to group them, which makes it easier to count. Make a Dollar is the easiest activity. Good site for teacher led count-bys of 5s, 10s, and 25s with application to money.

Nickel

The One Dollar Store

Penny

Count U.S. Coins

Students learn coin recognition, coin values and counting patterns. Users visually see the effect of counting by 5s and 10s.

Students count how much money they have by dragging coins and depositing them into a piggy bank. Total amount of coins to use appears unlimited. Teacher led instruction appropriate.

 

2.3 Measurement: Develop an understanding of linear measurement and facility in measuring.

2.3.1

Determine length by finding the total number of equal-length units that are placed end-to-end without gaps or overlaps.

Paper Clip

Length Strength: Paper clips

Students determine the length of an object by finding the total number of equal-length units that are placed end-to-end.

2.3.2

Apply concepts of partitioning (the mental activity of slicing the length of an object into equal-sized units) and transitivity (e.g., if object A is longer than object B and object B is longer than object C, then object A is longer than object C).

Exploring Measurement

Exploring Measurement

Students apply concept of transitivity to decide which object is longer, shorter, or the same size. This is appropriate as an introduction to the concept. Three levels of difficulty are provided.

2.3.3

Demonstrate an understanding that using different measurement units will result in different numerical measurements for the same object.

  N/A

2.3.4

Explain the need for equal length units and the use of standard units of measure.

  N/A

2.3.5

Use rulers and other measurement tools to estimate and measure length in common units (e.g., centimeter and inch).

Ruler

Estimating Customary Length

Students use a ruler to estimate and measure a line in inches.

Centimeter

Estimating Metric Length

Students measure and predict the length of a line by measuring in centimeters.

Centimeters

Length Strength: Centimeters

Students practice measuring skills using centimeters. Students use rulers and other measurement tools to estimate and measure length in common units.

Inches Length Strength: Inches

Students use a ruler to estimate and measure the length of objects using inches.

2.3.6

Use the measurement process: choose an appropriate measurement unit, compare that unit to the object, and report the number of units.

Scale

Measure: Postage

Students determine how much postage is required by weighing and measuring parcels and calculating on a chart the correct postage rate. Students need paper and pencil to record measurements before calculating on a chart correct postage. Teacher demonstration necessary because of level of difficulty to use the postage chart. Possible for teachers to put this site on their own blog or website.

2.3.7

Demonstrate an understanding of time and use of time relationships (e.g., how many minutes in an hour, days in a week, and months in a year).

AM

Analog and Digital Clocks

This activity has a clock that allows users to change the time forward or backward by 1 minute, 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, 30 minutes or 1 hour. It allows users to set it to the present time by pushing a button. Useful for teacher demonstrations.

This clock is simple and easy to read with its hour and minute hands being different colors. It can be changed from an analog clock to a 24 hour digital clock. It does not provide feedback on what time it is.

2.3.8

Tell time in increments of five minutes using analog and digital clocks.

AM

Analog and Digital Clocks

This activity has a clock that allows users to can change the time forward or backward by 1 minute, 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, 30 minutes or 1 hour. It allows users to set it to the present time by pushing a button. Useful for teacher demonstrations

This clock is simple and easy to read with its hour and minute hands being different colors. It can be changed from an analog clock to a 24 hour digital clock. It does not provide feedback on what time it is.

Clock

Time - Match Clocks

Students match the time by reading a digital clock and then setting the face clock, and vice versa. Gives good practice telling time to 5 minute increments, not to the minute.

Clock

Stop the Clock 3

Students drag five digital times to the correct five analogue clocks, then press Stop the Clock to record their time. Students try to beat their own time. Highly motivating site.